Buscador de noticias

Por título o palabra clave
  • Por fecha de publicación
Facebook Tweet Google+

UChile.online

HD 110014c Planet

Universidad de Chile's astronomer discovers planet with the triple of Jupiter's mass

The object can be found 320 light years away from Earth, a distance equivalent to the size of the Tarantula's Nebula and it was uncovered by Maritza Soto, a Ph.D student in the Astronomy Department of Universidad de Chile.

HD 110014c is the name of the planet, discovered using the radial velocity method, which measures the movement in the star that's produced when there's an object orbiting it.

HD 110014c is the name of the planet, discovered using the radial velocity method, which measures the movement in the star that's produced when there's an object orbiting it.

Maritza Soto, Ph.D in Astronomy student at Universidad de Chile.

Maritza Soto, Ph.D in Astronomy student at Universidad de Chile.

Enlaces relacionados
Versión de la noticia en español

In a year marked by astronomic discovers like the privileged view that we had a few weeks ago from Pluto, in Chile, emerges a new landmark in this subject. HD 110014c is the name of the planet discovered by Maritza Soto, a student in the Ph.D in Astronomy in the Physical and Mathematic Sciences Faculty at Universidad de Chile. “This planet orbits a red giant star, which is very atypical. Only one of five planets that are known orbits around this kind of stars”, explains Soto.

The discovery

The data analysis took almost eight months, while the finding was made using the radial velocity method, which measures the star movement that is produce when there’s an object orbiting it.

“The data of the HD110014 system was taken by another astronomers between the years 2004 and 2011. They were archived in the database of the European Souther Observatory (ESO). What we did was to take that data, re-study it, and then we realized that there was a planet that wasn't supposed to be there, or at least, one that nobody saw until then”, adds the astronomer.

The discovery was made using mainly data from the FEROS spectrograph, that’s on the 2.2m telescope on the ESO's La Silla Observatory and “we also used some data from HARPS spectrograph, that we could also find in La Silla”, concludes Maritza Soto.

A human team installed in Chile

The paper was published in the last printed edition of science magazine Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, where Maritza Soto signed as first author. In the scientific crew also participates the DAS' academic James Jenkins –who also is Soto's guidance teacher and who was in the team that discovered the nearest planet in habitable zone, Tau Ceti e- and Dr. Matías Jones from the Universidad Católica’s Astroengineer Center.

Artistic animation of the traslation movement of the planet orbiting its star, made by Ricardo Ramírez, student at the Msc. in Astronomy program at Universidad de Chile:

  • Compartir:
    https://uchile.cl/u114394
Su mensaje fue enviado correctamente
Nombre del Destinatario:
E-mail destinatario:
Su nombre:
Su e-mail:
Comentarios: